About

P8040057 (2)

Daisy Grace on the River Orwell, Suffolk, 2012

Daisy Grace is a Swallowboats Baycruiser 20 trailer-sailer. She is hull number 1, a fact of which I am inordinately proud. I saw her predecessor, the 20ft open Bayraider at the Beale Park Boatshow in June 2008. I had a trial sail in her with her designer/builder Matt Newland and made the fatal mistake of saying
“She’s lovely, but I’m really looking for a cabin boat.”
“I’ve designed a cabin version, I’m just waiting for the first order to start building…”
I went to Cardigan a few days later to see the workshop and have a sail in a Bayraider on the sea. I was hooked. I liked the boat and I liked the builder, so I crossed my fingers and ordered a brand new, untested design  “off plan” that would soak up my entire savings.

Building started in February 2009 and I took delivery in July. Within a week my daughter and I had sailed her from Poole to the Isle of Wight and back. I have never regretted the rash decision to buy. I hadn’t really been looking for any sort of boat at all.

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10 thoughts on “About

  1. Ed Ricciardelli

    I have been looking for a daysailer since I sold my 33′ Endevour last year. I sail on the ICW and coastal Atlantic odd the North Carolina Coast. Often singlehanded. Shoal waters at low tide- 2feet. Want to be able to weekend on her. I’m sold on either the BC 20 or the BC 23. I love the lines of the 20 and the mizzen. Im close to committing. Any thoughts. Love ur site. How does she do in open water ( coastal cruising)

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    1. Julian Swindell Post author

      Hi Ed. I think you would love a Swallow Boat. Have you seen Rob Johnson’s blog about sailing his BC23 around Great Britain? I think that would reassure you about its coastal sailing abilities. I know Matt Newland who owns Swallow Boats is keen to get into the American market, so it would be well worth talking to him. There are a couple of open Bayraider 20s in the States I think, and one BC20 up on the Great Lakes, built by Jim Levang.

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  2. Ed

    Thank you Julian for the reply. I will look at the blog site. I looked at one of the BR 20s in Ga. I am really wanting at least a small cabin. Hopefully, I will be talking to you about my new Swallow Boat soon! Have a great holiday

    Ed

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  3. Andy

    Hi Julian, any idea why many pics are missing from your old blogspot pages? I was trying to find the pics of your shed build but they just show as triangles…

    Thanks

    Andy

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  4. Julian Swindell Post author

    Hi Andy. It was the problem with handling pictures that got me fed up with blogger. The pictures are stored in unexpected places in other parts of Google’s empire and I found that I had deleted great chunks of them inadvertently. I can’t really reload them as they change the file names and the links don’t work. So I have just left the site as it stands. In WordPress the pictures are stored with the blog, so at least you know where they are.

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  5. Adrian Shield

    Julian,
    I am currently looking at a BayCruiser 20 to replace my Cornish Crabber 24. I have been reading some of your excellent blog and seem to remember an item about the ballast tank input valve breaking off, but can’t find it again. It is a concerning weak point. Can you remind me of the details.

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    1. Julian Swindell Post author

      Hi Adrian
      It was a false alarm. What I later realised it’s that the movable part of the self bailer is designed to be pulled out into the boat, to allow clearing. It just slots back into place and want broken at all. Slotting it in in the ballast tank is tricky as you have to do it at arms length by feel. I’m not planning to do it again!

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  6. Adrian Shield

    Interested in your boom gallows for Cory Louise (BayCruiser 20 number 3). Do you have any details of its design?

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    1. Julian Swindell Post author

      I’m afraid I just designed it myself. The main, curved top plank is just three lengths of thin softwood from Homebase, laminated to a curve with epoxy. The uprights are two handrail stanchions. You can get variously angled socket bases for them. I just experimented until I got the height about right. There was quite a lot about it on my old blogger blog, but I think all of the pictures got lost. I find the gallows really useful and use them as a support for a cockpit tent as well.

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